Is Architecture ur cuppa

Today I’m going to share some of my experience in applying to architecture/architecture and landscape. Before we get started, let me ring a bell: this article may include fearsome and excitement to tears, so please get some fine tissue ready for yourself.
Ok let us begun.
1. What makes me feel Architecture is right for me
I myself is the taboo that cannot be judged between being either science-y or arty. Last year as my AS subject, I did art, physics, maths and further Math, and really enjoy the combination. I’ve always been interested in product design or interior design, plus I tried to seek for a broader course because I don’t quite want to specify yet.
I came from Shanghai, China and every now and then when I fly though the Pudong International Airport and Charles de Gaulle the airport in Paris, these bright and almost civil structure buildings comfort me: weirdly, I’ve been resting there way too often. So I started considering studying architecture in uni.
Work in architecture, you need:
• drawing and design skills
• good teamworking skills – are u willing to share your ideas, experience and knowledge
• problem-solving skills- to consider of the intended use of the building, safety, use of sustainable materials, the building’s expected life span, and costs.
• good numerical and ICT skills
• the ability to work accurately and methodically
• negotiation skills
• excellent communication skills – you will have a lot of contact with clients, contractors and other professionals.
After all, I will put these tags for the identities for an architect. #Artist #Engineer #Sociable
2. Career-wise: Education and training
It takes at least seven years of full-time study to qualify as an architect in the UK: 3+2+2. ‘Toughie’!
A bachelor’s degree is required first and foremost and is known as ‘Part 1’. Usually lasting three years of full-time study, the undergraduate degree in architecture.
On completion of your undergrad degree, ‘Part 2’ can be commenced. This part of the process enhances your overall architectural knowledge and looks at project complexity. Whilst the actual qualification varies between institutions (BArch, Diploma, MArch), the stage generally takes two years of full-time study to complete. You can choose transfer to a different university. Most courses are design-based and rely heavily on project work that is undertaken throughout the course. This part of architectural study allows you to enhance key ideas and skills.
The final stage of your architectural training , known as ‘Part 3’, requires you to complete a minimum of two years in professional training prior to your final exams. The course is taken at an RIBA-validated provider institution and once this final part has been completed and students graduate, you can register as an architect with the Architects Registration Board (ARB). This allows you to use the title ‘architect’ which is protected by law, so that only properly qualified architects can offer their services to the public.
However, the good news is that whilst you are training for the long session, you can still do other things at the same time. If we only live once towards 25year-old (ie 18 the age now+ 7training) why not do something I really enjoy?

3. entry requirement and skills
Typical requirements are art, maths and another science, possibly physics or geography. Since this is such a broad and complex field, It’s important to check individual degree course entry requirements carefully as they do vary widely in their approach, structure and emphasis.

It’s still amazing that im applying for this 7 years course. Again, this is my experience. Some for the acknowledgement may be totally wrong and if so, would you please kindly comment and let me know? In a way the more discussion happen, the better we can all get to know this field of architecture. Thanks.